We know how much our kids use the multitude of screens available to them for TV watching and video games, texting and social media on cell phones (no, they don’t actually use the phone function), homework and fun work on computers, and all of the above on tablets. When it comes to their parents’ use of electronic media, the apple apparently doesn’t fall far from the tree. Kelly Wallace discovers that “parents spend as much time plugged in each day as their teens and three hours more per day than their tweens”:

The survey, sponsored by Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization that helps parents, educators and children negotiate media and technology, found that parents of tweens and teens spend more than nine hours a day on average on screens. More than 80% of that time was for pleasure, not work, with parents watching television, playing video games, social networking, browsing websites, or doing other things on a computer, smartphone or tablet.

 

It’s not just a fondness for Facebook or Instagram that parents and children share. It’s also the common belief that different screens can be juggled without losing a step:

When it comes to media multitasking — using more than one screen at a time, such as watching TV while writing a proposal for work on your laptop — about two-thirds of parents said it had no impact on the quality of their work.

When it comes to media multitasking — using more than one screen at a time, such as watching TV while writing a proposal for work on your laptop — about two-thirds of parents said it had no impact on the quality of their work.

 

While kids probably worry not-at-all about their parents’ use of social media, the opposite is not true. 50% of parents in the Common Sense Media survey worry that social media interferes with exercise and physical fitness, 35% are afraid their child’s focus suffers, and 34% are concerned that face-to-face communication is hurt. Internet use also concerns parents:

Fifty-six percent of the parents surveyed are concerned their children may become addicted to the Internet, 34% worry that screen use negatively impacts sleep and 38% are concerned about the over-sharing of personal details.

 

Despite all these concerns and fears, Wallace says that most parents see electronic media in a positive light:

While parents want to monitor what their kids are doing online and prepare them for what they might see, they overwhelmingly view technology as beneficial when it comes to their children’s academic achievements.

Ninety-four percent said technology supports their children’s education and school work.

 

 

More PediaBlog on screen time, social media, and technology here.

 

(Google Images)