Sugar Overload

  We have addressed the many ways in which excess sugar consumption impacts health many times before on The PediaBlog.¬†We know that eating and drinking too much sugar increases the risks in children AND adults for the complications of overweight and obesity,...

More Water, Less Sugar

  The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015-2020 (Eighth Edition), published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and Department of Agriculture, recommend water, low-fat or fat-free milk, and 100% fruit juices as the primary beverages for American...

Limiting Fruit Juices

A new policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Nutrition recommends that parents avoid giving their infants fruit juices for the first year of life. Juices have a high sugar content while lacking the fiber that whole fruit has, leading to...

The Processed Food Experiment

Yesterday, we were brought along on a thought experiment conducted by pediatric endocrinologist and professor, Robert H. Lustig, M.D. After reviewing the characteristics that define “processed food” and considering its nutritional properties, it’s...

Secondhand Sugar

Michael I. Goran and Emily Ventura cite recent pediatric research to make the argument that “secondhand sugar” exposure prenatally and during lactation is dangerous to children’s health: If you saw a pregnant woman smoking, you would undoubtedly be...