It took six years to develop and now Fortnite has become one of the most popular video games in history. Here is a synopsis of the game your kids might be currently enamored with:

One day, 98% of Earth’s population suddenly disappeared, and the remaining population found the skies covered in dense clouds, creating chaotic storms that dropped husks, humanoid zombie-like creatures, that attacked the living. The survivors found ways to construct “storm shields”, a field that cleared the storm clouds from immediately overhead and reduced the attacks from husks, and used these to set up survivor bases across the globe. The player is a commander of one of these bases, charged with going out of the storm shield to find resources, survivors, and other allies to help expand their storm shield and find a way to return Earth to its normal state.

 

Common Sense Media explains what all the hoopla is about in an excellent review article:

The Fortnite frenzy seemed to come out of nowhere — almost as if it dropped from a party bus in the sky. And now many parents are taking notice of this rollicking game where players fight to the death. With Fortnite‘s millions of players and sudden success, you might be wondering: What’s it all about — and is it OK for my kids?

This survival-action game is a bit like what you’d get if you combined a sandbox-building game like Minecraft with an action shooter like Call of Duty. On one hand, it’s getting major points with kids and parents alike for building teamwork and thoughtful collaboration. On the other hand, it’s a combat-based game with tons of guns and violence.

 

“A combat-based game with tons of guns and violence.” Hmmm. You might ask yourself (and your significant other):

Is Fortnite appropriate for kids?

For some parents, the cartoonish, bloodless style of the action in Fortnite makes the violence less problematic than the aggressive gore in other popular shooter games. But the game’s online chat feature — especially in Battle Royale — could expose younger players to offensive language or mature content from random strangers. Common Sense doesn’t recommend games with open chat for kids under 13, but with the right controls and parental guidance, this can be a tween-friendly alternative to violent first-person shooters.

 

There are a lot more details about Fortnite that might help you avoid a battle royale with your kids. You can read them here at commonsensemedia.org

 

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